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Cimarron Pass

Silver Thread Byway & Slumgullion Pass:  Hwy 149 from Lake City to Creed

 Features Slumgullion Pass and the North Clear Creek Falls Waterfalls.  This is one of the best highways in Colorado.

Silver Thread winds for 75 miles through the breathtaking San Juan Mountains on the Gunnison and Rio Grande National Forests. This paved route travels through the quaint mining towns of Lake City, Creede and South Fork.

The byway climbs 11,000-foot Slumgullion Pass and crosses the Continental Divide. 

 

 

North Clear Creek Falls

 

North Clear Creek Falls

Alongside Highway 149 in the Silverton area, view water from the North Clear Creek Falls that travels from flat land over a cliff and into the Rio Grande River below

 

 

 

 

 

North Clear Creek Falls

Along side Highway 149 about 1/2 mile off of roadway.

 

 

 

North Clear Creek Falls

View from the top of the falls.                          

 

 

Slumgullion Earthflow

Slumgullion Earthflow

One of two known in Colorado.  Massive in scope.  

       Note the trees that are turned sideways by the speed of the earthflow.

 

 

 

Slumgullion Earthflow   

Why here?                

 

 

 

Slumgullion Earthflow

Slumgullion Pass Summit, elevation 11,361', is said to be named after the popular miner's stew, which is multi-colored due to the variety of vegetables and meats found in it. Others say that New Englanders named it Slumgullion because the slide resembled the multicolored "refuse" from butchered whale. In fact, if you happen to get to view the ground just after a hearty rainstorm, you'll notice that the colors turn to red and brown, or multi-colored.

It crosses the Slumgullion Earthflow, a National Natural Landmark. The 700-year-old mudflow is four miles long and 2,000 feet wide. Some sections are moving 28 feet a year. The first flow was so large and cataclysmic,, the earthflow dammed the Lake Fork of the Gunnison River and created Lake San Cristobal. The three-square mile lake is the second largest natural lake in Colorado. The earthflow, or mudslide, began  when, lubricated by heavy rains, the weak volcanic tuff and breccia on the southern flank of Mesa Seco slumped several miles down the steep mountainside. About 350 years ago, a second earthflow started from the top of the mountain. The new flow is still moving.

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 

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